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Dads who spend more time with their children have a different brain structure

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Published on 12/11/2021

A study published by the University of Essex found that Dads who spent more time with their children have different brain structures to dads who are less involved. 

The study found that men who are actively involved in childcare and want to enjoy time with their children have a large hypothalamus. The hypothalamus is an almond-sized area of ​​the brain that is known to play an important role in attachment and parenting.

The team is uncertain whether the hypothalamus increases in size the more time is spent with the child, or if some men are born in increased amounts.

The study scanned the brains of 50 dads and the participants filled out a questionnaire about their long-term care beliefs and how much they enjoyed spending time with their children.

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The higher the men scored in the test, the larger the size of the hypothalamus.

Dr. Pascal Wurtichika, who conducted the study, said: “In many societies, fathers’ involvement in childcare has increased dramatically.

“Men want to spend more time and connect more closely with their children. They want to be more involved and confident fathers. We have now shown that these long-term care beliefs can be traced deep into the father’s brain.”

Dr. Vrtička added:

“Our data show that this is seen not only in the anatomy of the father’s brain, but also in the brain-to-brain synchronization with the child, especially the father who is more confidently involved. In the case of.

“Therefore, it seems very appropriate and justified to promote the importance of fathers’ involvement in childcare in a broader social context and to support them as much as possible.”

 

What do you think about the new findings?  Let us know your thoughts in the comment section below!

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