Silver Cross Jet Review, SilverCross JET 4685 2%, product-review%

Silver Cross Jet Review

The Jet from Silver Cross is a super-compact metro-style buggy.

Outwardly it appears very similar to many other buggies of this style (e.g. the Ergobaby Metro, Babyzen Yoyo, Uppababy Minu) but it has a unique folding system – when folded down the bumper bar becomes a handy handle allowing you to wheel the pushchair around like a classic wheely suitcase.

When collapsed in this way the package is small enough to fit into overhead storage lockers and is, according to Silver Cross, cabin-certified on all major airlines. The pram clocks in at around £275 (currently £225), putting it roughly in the middle of the price range for prams of this nature. The question is does the compact wheely nature of the folded pram do enough to set it apart from other metro-style puschairs? Let’s find out…

Unboxing and building

The Silver Cross Jet comes in a TINY box – if it wasn’t for the branding on the carton I would have not believed I had a pram in front of me! There is no wasted space inside, and surprisingly there is very little to build once the contents are laid out. Clip on the two front wheels, unfold the pram and clip on the bumper bar and you’re ready to go!

Construction

The frame of the jet is made of painted metal tubing, and feels strong and sturdy. There is very little side-to-side wobble in the assembled and unfolded pushchair, which I find unusual for a pram with this design. The wheels are firm rubber, and all the fabric feels heavy duty and sturdy – no complaints here.

Folding

The folding mechanism, at times was a little fiddly. It has a few steps – first press two buttons, and fold the handle down in the centre, then use your foot to activate a breakpoint between the wheels of the pram. You get the hang of it after a few practices, and I ended up mastering it.

Now the pram can be folded, which requires some careful pushing down on the handle bar at the same time as guiding the frame around the wheels inward so that everything folds correctly. Line up the wheels at the start makes this smoother.

A plastic catch engages and holds the whole thing shut. From here you can remove the bumper bar to make it even more compact, or leave it attached to use as a handle to wheel the pram around. I pretty much couldn’t do this one-handed, even after a few practice rounds but like I say, you get the hang of it. One thing to be aware of is, I found that sometimes if one side of the pram folded more than the other it wouldn’t line up correctly so watch out for that.

The pram DOES fold down to an incredibly small package, but it seems that the cost of this is a fairly complex and tricky folding mechanism.

Unfolding the pram is super easy. You simply have to disengage the plastic catch that holds it closed, hold the bar between the wheels in place with a foot and pull up on the handle bar. There is even a handy indicator on one of the main vertical braces of the pram to indicate that it has been correctly unfolded – a feature I liked a lot!

Using the pram

The jet feels smooth and sturdy to wheel around compared to other metro-style pushchairs. The wheel bearings are smooth and the wheels, although small, feel like they deal with pavements and park paths well.

It is, however, still a very small pushchair oriented toward urban environments. On grass or other uneven surfaces it can feel awkward and comparatively difficult to manoeuvre. The seat straps are secure, and the seat seems comfortable with plenty of space to support the legs, an adjustable leg area and plenty of space and padding for children up to 15kg. Our two-year old seemed very happy in it! Silver Cross claim that the pram is suitable from birth, but I am not sure I would be totally comfortable putting a newborn in the seat, even in the most reclined position, although that’s just personal preference; I don’t think I would be with any stroller of this style and design.

The seat has a classic strap-based reclining system, and goes right back to a flat laying-down position, which is great for a sleeping kid! In general I really like these reclining systems as they allow more or less infinite adjustment for comfort. It does, however, feel a little too reclined even in its most upright position (like many other prams with this reclining system design). The under-pram basket is a good size, given how small the pram is, but it has a large metal bar bisecting it. This made it difficult to put in items like a rucksack or a bag of shopping, but it was totally fine for smaller, loose items such as water bottles, books, toys and sticks. The brake system is really nice – there’s one foot pedal (red) to turn on the brake, and another (green) to turn it off. The brake was never sticky, and never got caught and it was always easy to engage. Plus points there! The hood is big enough to provide decent amounts of shade in most situations, and has a little peekaboo window in it as well, which is always nice. 

Verdict

The Jet is a remarkably compact pushchair, and would make a great travel-pram. It is suitable for overhead compartments on aeroplanes, and the fact that it wheels around so easily when folded means that it is a doddle to carry around with you when not in use. It is well-suited to city life, being a smooth and comfortable ride on pavements and compact enough for public transport (although I should say this is just my impression – thanks to the COVID-19 pandemic I was unable to actually take the pram on the tube/train/bus). On the other hand, it has a little tricky and fiddly folding mechanism, and, if you’re carrying a rucksack or large shopping bag, the under-pram basket is restricting. If you are in the market for a city pram and you put a lot of stock in travel-specific features (ease of transportation, airline-friendly, super compact) then the Jet is as good as it gets.

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